Case In Images
 
Traumatic posterior hip instability and reconstruction with a femoral head allograft in a young man
Yalçin Turhan1, Mehmet Arican1, Zekeriya Okan Karaduman1, Ozan Turhal2, Cemal Güler3, Yunus Emre Bulum4
1Assistant Professor, Düzce University, Medical Faculty, Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department, Konuralp Street-Düzce, Turkey
2MD, Cizre State Hospital, Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department, Cizre-Sirnak, Turkey
3MD, çorum State Hospital, Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department, çorum-Turkey
4MD, Düzce University, Medical Faculty, Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department, Konuralp Street-Düzce, Turkey

Article ID: 100893Z01YT2018
doi: 10.5348/100893Z01YT2018CI

Corresponding Author:
Yalçin Turhan,
Assistant Professor, Düzce University, Medical Faculty,
Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department,
Konuralp Street-Düzce, Turkey

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How to cite this article
Turhan Y, Arican M, Karaduman ZO, Turhal O, Güler C, Bulum YE. Traumatic posterior hip instability and reconstruction with a femoral head allograft in a young man. Int J Case Rep Images 2018;9:100893Z01YT2018.


ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hip fracture-dislocations after a traumatic event are devastating conditions. As a result of the increasing traffic road accidents, the incidence of the hip fracture-dislocations raise. Most of the hip dislocations require surgical management especially in the presence of acetabular wall or femoral head fractures. If the primary surgical management fails, there are not many options for the revision of hip instability.

Case Report: A 20-year-old drug addicted man, who had a traffic accident brought to our emergency department with a hip fracture-dislocation and posterior acetabular wall fracture. After a satisfactory surgical management patient had a second major trauma after eighth months and the hip was unstable after this trauma. An allograft reconstruction of the posterior acetabular wall is made for this instability.

Conclusion: The patient's range of motion was very good and he had no complaint about his hip at the 22nd month follow-up. This technique should be kept in mind in rare cases in which the acetabular defect causing instability of the hip is not correctible with routine ways.

Keywords: Femoral head allograft, Hip dislocation, Instability


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Author Contributions
Yalçin Turhan – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Mehmet Arican – Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Final approval of the version to be published
Zekeriya Okan Karaduman – Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Final approval of the version to be published
Ozan Turhal – Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Final approval of the version to be published Cemal Gü ler – Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Final approval of the version to be published Yunus Emre Bulum – Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of Submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of Support
None
Consent Statement
Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this study.
Conflict of Interest
Author declares no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2018 Yalçin Turhan et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.