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International Journal of Case Reports and Images - IJCRI - Case Reports, Case Series, Case in Images, Clinical Images

     
Case Report
 
Spontaneous expulsion and migration of a bronchial foreign body: A flustering rare dental accident
Koken Ameku1, Mariko Higa1
1MD, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Okinawa Prefectural Nanbu Medical Center and Children’s Medical Center, Arakawa Haebaru-cho, Shimajiri, Okinawa, Japan

Article ID: Z01201710CR10843KA
doi:10.5348/ijcri-2017104-CR-10843

Address correspondence to:
Koken Ameku
Department of Respiratory Medicine
Okinawa Prefectural Nanbu Medical Center & Children’s Medical Center
118-1 Arakawa Haebaru-cho, Shimajiri
Okinawa
Japan 901-1193

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How to cite this article
Ameku K, Higa M. Spontaneous expulsion and migration of a bronchial foreign body: A flustering rare dental accident. Int J Case Rep Images 2017;8(10):668–671.


ABSTRACT

Introduction: A bronchial foreign body is a dangerous medical emergency that is potentially life-threatening. Spontaneous expulsion should neither be expected nor experienced. Thus, early removal with a bronchoscope should be performed to prevent complications. Spontaneous expulsion of a bronchial foreign body is rare, with few cases reported. Additionally, its occurrence and associated clinical complications are not studied and unclear. We describe a patient in whom a bronchial foreign body was expectorated spontaneously and swallowed into the digestive tract.
Case Report: An 80-year-old male aspirated a tooth in the left lower airway during a dental procedure. Flexible bronchoscopy performed on the next day found no foreign body in either bronchial tree. However, it was found on the abdominal radiograph. It was considered to have been expectorated and then swallowed before bronchoscopy. One week later, the patient had passed it.
Conclusion: This case demonstrated that a bronchial foreign body can rarely be expelled spontaneously. Besides, an expelled foreign body can be swallowed, or it can migrate to another location. Regarding spontaneous expectoration and migration, injury to the airway and digestive tract can occur depending on its shape. However, such dangers have not been addressed, because spontaneous expectoration is rare and unrecognized. Recognizing these dangers and warning patients of them could avoid additional complications.

Keywords: Dental care, Foreign bodies, Foreign body migration, Spontaneous remission



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Author Contributions
Koken Ameku – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Mariko Higa – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of support
None
Conflict of interest
Authors declare no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2017 Koken Ameku et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.



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