International Journal of Case Reports and Images - IJCRI - Case Reports, Case Series, Case in Images, Clinical Images

   
Case Report
 
Recurrent giant hydatid cyst in the left axilla: A case report
Abbas Alibakhshi1, Mehrdad Larry2
1MD, General Surgery Department, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2MD-MPH, General Surgery Department, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, mehrdad.

Article ID: Z01201603CR10612AA
doi:10.5348/ijcri-201625-CR-10612

Address correspondence to:
Mehrdad Larry
MD-MPH, General Surgery Department
Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences
Tehran
Iran, 1419733141

Access full text article on other devices

  Access PDF of article on other devices

[HTML Full Text]   [PDF Full Text] [Print This Article]
[Similar article in Pumed] [Similar article in Google Scholar]


How to cite this article
Alibakhshi A, Larry M. Recurrent giant hydatid cyst in the left axilla: A case report. Int J Case Rep Images 2016;3(7):158–161.


Abstract
Introduction: Hydatid disease in the musculature of the axillary area has scarcely been reported before. Also, the overall involvement of muscles with this tapeworm infection is not prevalent. The infection is associated with contact of human beings and livestock. It can subsequently involve many different organs in the body, mostly liver and lungs.
Case Report: We report a case of a hydatid disease, affecting the axillary region of a 30-year-old male. He was diagnosed with a similar hydatid cyst four years ago in the same location and undergone surgery; but it had gradually augmented in the same place since then. He also had a history of cerebral hydatid disease (CHD) when he was nine years old which was surgically removed; but it was not documented. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan reinforced the diagnosis, showing a large multicystic mass in inferior tip of the left scapula and in the dorsal thoracic muscles invading the deltoid, infraspinatous, teres major and teres minor muscles. No pulmonary or hepatic involvement was seen. The patient was given three months of albendazole preoperatively and en bloc resection without destroying the cyst wall was performed. Adjunctive albendazole chemotherapy (15 mg/kg/day) was prescribed for three months.
Conclusion: Clinical and radiological suspicion to hydatid disease in endemic areas is important for the diagnosis of the disease. Providing information for people on how the disease is transmitted and improving health care for prevention of the disease is of utmost importance.

Keywords: Axillary mass, Hydatid disease, Musculoskeletal surgery


[HTML Full Text]   [PDF Full Text]

Author Contributions
Abbas Alibakhshi – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Mehrdad Larry – Analysis and interpretation of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of support
None
Conflict of interest
Authors declare no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2016 Abbas Alibakhshi et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.



  Home line About IJCRI line Aim and Scope line Sections line Open Access line Archives
Apply as Editor line Apply as Reviewer line Submit Reviews - Editors line Submit Reviews - Reviewers
Instructions for Authors line Templates to Use line Copyright Form line Author Checklist
Online Submission line Email Submission line Submit Revision line Submit All Forms line Submit Page Proofs
Terms of Service line Privacy policy line Disclaimer line FAQ line Contact: Journal line Contact: Edorium Journals line Site Map
 
  Copyright © 2017. Edorium. All rights reserved.